What do the parties have to say about energy? Part 4: UKIP

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What do the parties have to say about energy? Part 4: UKIP

By |2017-12-19T15:14:23+01:00June 6th, 2017|Energy, Regulations & Policy|

Only two days to go until the UK General Election 2017, and in the fourth article in our series on energy in the leading parties’ campaigns, the spotlight is on UKIP’s vision for the energy market.

“UKIP will remove VAT from domestic energy bills and scrap the green levies currently added to our bills to subsidise renewable energy schemes.”

“Together, these measures will cut typical household energy bills by £170 a year.” Well that’s a huge opening gambit that sounds like something everyone can get behind! The big question to this statement when looking at it from an energy market perspective is how do we continue to drive down our carbon footprint if there is no mechanism in place to pay for the improvements and technologies required? There is also no clarity on if the scrapping of levies also applies to business or is it purely domestic like their VAT pledge.

“End wasteful subsidies to ‘renewable energy scams’, such as wind turbines and solar farms putting up bills by 11%”

UKIP take a very different approach than all other parties by making zero commitments to greener energy and in fact state that they repeal the 2008 Climate Change Act, which they call “the most expensive piece of legislation in history”.

They state that they support a “diverse energy market based on coal, nuclear, shale gas, conventional gas, oil, solar & hydro”.

UKIP do state that they support solar & hydro along with nuclear energy but want to remove the subsides that are currently included in supply agreements – well, who is going to pay for the solar and hydro to be generated?

Like several of the other manifestos, UKIP have little mention of any SME business energy policies but they do state they would like to prevent energy-intensive businesses from being driven offshore. The question is at what cost to our climate as they have no provisions for greener energy at all.

Does any of this raise questions for you that you would like us to answer? Contact us! In our next and last policy review on Wednesday we will cover the Green Party.

Find the full UKIP manifesto here

About the Author:

Jonathan Reeves